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How to Drive Smart and Save Money

With no end in sight to rising gas prices, consumers should take control of how they drive their vehicle to get more miles per gallon. The Car Care Council recommends the following ways to drive smart and save money:

Show Your Car a Little Love

Your car doesn’t want flowers, or balloons, or even candy this Valentine’s Day – it just wants a little love in the form of an oil change, tune-up and basic service. There’s no debating the value of preventive maintenance to keep your car running well – not to mention getting you safely to your hot Valentine’s Day date – according to the Car Care Council. This Valentine’s Day, treat your car to regular care and take the following preventive maintenance steps:

TPMS Will Tell you if your Tires are Under Pressure

You’ve just purchased a new vehicle and already a dashboard warning light is on, but this is one you might not have seen before. There’s a good chance it’s the new warning light tied to the Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), which as of 2008, is standard on all new cars and light trucks, according to the Car Care Council.

Take the Gas Saving 101 Quiz

The Car Care Council’s short Gas Saving 101 Quiz is a reminder to all motorists that the number of miles per gallon (mpg) a car gets is directly related to driving behavior and vehicle maintenance.  

“Motorists can very easily save money on gas by driving smarter, and keeping an eye on a few of the vehicle components that affect fuel economy,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.  

TRUE OR FALSE

Q. 1 – Properly inflated tires improve gas mileage?  

147 Million Gallons of Wasted Gas? It's a Drop in the Bucket

Loose gas caps, under inflated tires, faulty thermostats, worn spark plugs, malfunctioning engine controls, poor wheel alignment and the list goes on. These are among the conditions that daily cost consumers millions of dollars in wasted fuel.

Checklist for Selecting the Right Auto Repair Shop

Is your car in good hands when it needs repairs or maintenance? The Car Care Council recommends looking for the following characteristics in critiquing and selecting an auto repair shop to care for one of your most valuable assets:  

Keeping Your Car Can Save You Money

You’ve just made your last car payment. Should you keep the car or trade it in for a brand new vehicle? According to the Car Care Council, keeping your car rather than buying a new one is the way to go, especially if your goal is to save money.  

“People who keep their cars, treat them as valuable investments and commit to regular vehicle maintenance, end up saving a lot of money,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.  

In Tune with Engine Noises from a NASCAR Engine Specialist

Noises, we’ve all heard them coming from under the hood at one time or another in our cars and trucks. But a NASCAR Engine Specialist’s ears are filled with the roar of engines every weekend. He’s in charge of taking care of the engines and making sure they run smoothly after they get to the racetrack.

An engine failure during a race eliminates any chances of winning. So, as you can imagine, he plays an integral role on the race team.

Fuel Savings Tips as Gas Prices Soar

With gas prices exceeding four dollars a gallon in many parts of the country, the Car Care Council is offering gas-saving maintenance and driving tips that really work.

"Millions of dollars worth of gasoline is wasted every day by motorists, because simple and inexpensive vehicle maintenance is neglected," said Rich White, executive director of the Car Care Council. "Loose or missing gas caps, under-inflated tires, worn spark plugs and dirty air filters all contribute to poor fuel economy."

The Car Care Council offers these fuel-saving tips:

Timing Belt: Out of Sight and Mind

Remember when cars used to have at least several rubber belts under the hood? Called “fan” belts or drive belts, they’ve been replaced on most late model vehicles with a single, “serpentine” drive belt. Another belt under the hood of most cars is hidden under a cover at the front of the engine. It’s the timing belt, often overlooked during routine maintenance.

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