Belts and Hoses

Happily Ever After With Your Car

If you want to add more years to the relationship between you and your car, give it a little extra attention this Valentine’s Day in the form of an oil change, tune-up or other loving service to make sure it runs happily ever after. Just a little extra care can lead to a longer life for your car.

There’s no debating the value of preventive maintenance to keep your car running efficiently.By giving your vehicle a little more attention now, you’ll avoid the heartbreak and unexpected expense of car trouble down the road.

Green Your Vehicle Routine

The Car Care Council suggests you “green your routine” when it comes to your car and offers five ways you and your vehicle can help protect the environment and save at the pump.

“Basic vehicle maintenance goes a long way toward protecting the environment, and it can keep more ‘green’ in your wallet through better fuel economy,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Vehicle owners who do their own maintenance should remember to recycle or properly dispose of fluids and other vehicle components, including used motor oil, tires and batteries.”

Vehicle Care Tips Combat Skyrocketing Gas Prices

October is Fall Car Care Month, and the Car Care Council recommends the following ways to fight rising gas prices:

The No-Fail Valentine’s Day Gift

Giving the gift of tender loving care to one’s vehicle will pay off in terms of dependability and performance this Valentine’s Day, according to the Car Care Council.

“When that gift translates into maintenance, motorists can expect a positive and tangible response from their vehicle in terms of dependability and performance,” said Rich White of the Car Care Council.

Vehicle Neglect Takes the "Pun" Out of Thanksgiving

Don’t let soaring gas prices gobble up your hard earned money this Thanksgiving weekend; carve out some time to perform some simple fixins on your vehicle for better gas mileage, advises the Car Care Council. Or how about:

Ghouls and Goblins Make Halloween Driving Spooky

For motorists, the spooky part about Halloween is that little ghouls and goblins often dress in dark colors and in costumes that cover their eyes, and some get so excited they simply forget road safety rules. To help keep trick-or-treaters as safe as possible, the Car Care Council reminds motorists to drive slowly, especially through neighborhoods, to be extra careful when entering or exiting driveways or alleyways, and make sure the vehicle’s brakes and lights work properly.

Fall into a Vehicle Maintenance Program

October is Fall Car Care Month, the perfect time to fall into a vehicle maintenance program and get your car ready for the challenges of harsh winter weather.

“A thorough inspection of your vehicle during Fall Car Care Month will go a long way toward ensuring safety and dependability when temperatures drop and severe winter weather strikes,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “A routine maintenance program also makes financial sense, extending useful vehicle life and helping avoid costly repairs down the road.”

Don’t Let Your Thanksgiving Road Trip be a Turkey

One way to ensure you will get to dinner in time for turkey on Thanksgiving weekend is by making sure that the vehicle you will be driving is running well. A 10-minute pre-trip check is small potatoes compared to a big helping of inconvenience if you break down many miles away from home.

Caring for Your Car During Summer

Summer can be tough on cars, especially during high temperatures when heat can destroy batteries and stress the cooling system and tires. As a precaution, these vehicle components should be checked periodically during summer to help avoid breakdowns and car problems, according to the Car Care Council.

Timing Belt: Out of Sight and Mind

Remember when cars used to have at least several rubber belts under the hood? Called “fan” belts or drive belts, they’ve been replaced on most late model vehicles with a single, “serpentine” drive belt. Another belt under the hood of most cars is hidden under a cover at the front of the engine. It’s the timing belt, often overlooked during routine maintenance.


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